Date of Award

2014

First Advisor

Kathryn Boswell

Second Advisor

Nancy Bonvillain

Abstract

The long-marginalized, diverse, autochtonous Amazigh people in Morocco highlight broader questions of language planning which simplifies more complex linguistic and cultural concerns that challenge the creation of cohesive, monolithic national identities. Language and nationalism is tied together by the connection between language and culture, resulting in national language policy and planning. Western ideas of nationalism influence nationalism of post-colonial states, exemplified by a case study of language planning in Indonesia. Ideas of legitimacy influence linguistic and cultural rights, and this thesis calls for a radical re-thinking of already existing theory surrounding nationalism and language. Morocco exists as a lens through which to view these theoretical concerns, illuminated by fieldwork conducted in country in the fall of 2012 as well as historical research.

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