Date of Submission

Spring 2014

Academic Programs and Concentrations

Studio Arts

Project Advisor 1

Ellen Driscoll

Abstract/Artist's Statement

My work in sculpture is inspired by the environment and I use only materials that come from it: stone, ice, and clay. As an artist I strive to construct pieces that take on a life of their own. I utilize techniques of stone masonry such as balance, structural formation, and axial stone sculpture, where all of the stones are dry laid with no mortar, when creating my work. I use stones so the viewer is able to see sculptures made of materials only found in their true forms in the forest, creeks, and mountains. I enjoy making my viewers say, how is that possible?

I am interested in stones and the shapes they form when put together in surprising ways. I am also intrigued by how rarely materials used for veneering and foundations for homes are used to make art. Taking materials like stone out of its ordinary environment and using it to design sculptures is inspiring. To see stones in unlikely combinations, teetering on a single point, is exciting. When you see a work of art that so vividly connects you to a place not often seen, like Olafur Eliasson’s “The Weather Project”, you want to stay, take a second look, and ponder what it is that intrigues you so. I want my sculptures to make people look twice. I see my work as a twist of George Quasha, Andy Goldsworthy, Robert Smithson, and Carl Andre. I try to follow my heart when making sculptures, doing what I love to do.

It is vital that every one of my sculptures has two key ingredients: feeling, and a visual presence that fascinates the viewer. By using raw material and provoking such reactions, I am able to make work that will last a long time and will always hold an essence of mysticism.

Open Access Agreement

On-Campus only

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 License.

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